10 Terms You Need To Know If You’re Going Through a Military Divorce

Military families live under unique circumstances. These circumstances lead to many complications during divorce, not the least of which is terminology getting thrown around that you may not be familiar with. Here are some terms that are important to keep in mind when going through a military divorce.

BAH – Basic Allowance for Housing – The amount of money a service member receives from the military will change depending on their marital status and what their home duty station is. There is also a BAS – Basic Allowance for Subsistence. This is intended to provide food for the service member. It is not inmilitrylogo
tended to include meals for family members.

PCS – A Permanent Change of Station – This is where a service member is going to change the base where they primarily live and work.  This complicates custody issues in numerous significant ways.

Accompanied Tour – A duty station where a service member can bring their families.

DEERS – Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System. Enrollment in this system allows veterans and service members’ spouses and children to receive military benefits for which they may be eligible.

Base Privileges – Literally being allowed on the base. Military spouses and children are generally given full access to the housing and family areas. Base privileges can change and even be revoked after divorce.

GI Bill – This bill allows a service member to receive educational benefits.  After it passed in 2008, the “Post-9/11” GI Bill allowed service members to use the bill to pay for the education of their dependents as well as for themselves, something which was previously unavailable.

Tricare – Tricare is a service member’s health insurance policy, which is administered by the Department of Defense and which can be utilized by their family off base through associated insurance companies like Martin’s Point. Tricare is usually administered at no or low cost.

Military Pension  – The military awards long terms of service with a pension to be paid out monthly upon retirement. While the period of active duty service necessary to receive a full pension can vary somewhat, typically it is twenty years of active service (something sometimes referred to as having “done your twenty.”)

Special Pay  – Untaxed bonuses paid by the government to service members.   Some types of special pay include hardship, overseas duty, family separation, and under fire.

The 10/10 Rule – A service member needs to spend ten years in the service and must be married at least ten years in order for the military to automatically split their retirement pension with their former spouse.

If you’re a military family facing divorce call for a free consult. We’ll square you away and work to ensure the fairest outcome possible. 856-227-7888.

See also:

Military Prenup. Smart, Important, and Romantic.

Military Divorce Basic Training: 10/10 Rule

Where to File for Military Divorce.

Why Are People Rushing Into Military Divorce?

Military Divorce in New Jersey?

Maximize your GI Bill Benefits.

One thought on “10 Terms You Need To Know If You’re Going Through a Military Divorce

  1. I didn’t know about the 10/10 rule. I served a couple tours in Afghan and my old lady wants to break up. Luckily we haven’t been together for 10 years. That makes things simpler. Thanks for the information.

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